Posts tagged ‘Mental Health’

Anxiety and bullying affect student mental health (OECD>PISA results)

On April 19, the OECD has released a suite of resources based on the first OECD PISA assessment of students’ well-being. The report  analyses for the first time students’ motivation to perform well in school, their relationships with peers and teachers, their home life, and how they spend their time outside of school.

Here are the key links:

What can parents and schools do? (From PISA in Focus, # 71)

  • Schools can boost students’ motivation to achieve and build their confidence
  • Schools can function as caring communities only if they have engaged teachers
  • Students, even adolescent students, need their parents’ support
  • Students should be encouraged to exercise, eat healthily and use the Internet wisely

Check it all out! Rowan

April 25, 2017 at 8:00 am Leave a comment

2 picture books on Alzheimer’s and young children

The Professional Library has 2 new picture books on Alzheimer’s:

  1. Forget Me Not (2014, written by Nancy Van Laan; illustrated by Stephanie Graegin)
  2. Weeds in Nana’s Garden (2016, written and illustrated by Kathryn Harrison)

To search for more book resources on this topic, check

TDSB teacher can reserve these books in the catalgoue on the Virtual Library or by contacting us at (416) 395-8289 or professionallibrary@tdsb.on.ca.

Rowan

April 10, 2017 at 1:00 pm Leave a comment

Compassionate Classrooms

Created by the Alberta Teachers Association, Canadian Mental Health Association (Alberta) and Global TV, Compassionate Classrooms is a reference booklet for teachers about the mental health needs of their students. The most important factor for success in dealing with a mental health issue is support—and teachers are an important part of their students’ support system. This booklet provides teachers with information on common mental health issues, tools to help identify students in need and resources to help teachers make referrals to mental health professionals. Download a copy of Compassionate Classrooms,

Check it out! Rowan

April 5, 2017 at 1:00 pm Leave a comment

People for Education response to Ministry’s Well-being strategy

On March 22, People for Education released a response [pdf] to the Ministry’s Well-Being Strategy.

From page 1: “The Ministry of Education’s Well-Being Strategy follows strategies developed by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services in identifying four domains of success: Cognitive, Social, Physical, and Emotional. Using the same framework goals within the Ministry and across the youth sector is an essential step in establishing coherence in Ontario’s goals and policies for youth, from early learning through post-secondary education. The Well-Being Strategy has also articulated some important core policy areas – for example, Healthy Schools – that have a central role to play in supporting conditions of wellness in relation to learning in schools.

While People for Education supports the broad strokes of this work, we recognize that there are significant challenges that need to be addressed. These challenges sit in three critical areas: 1. Policy confusion, redundancy, and competition 2. Specificity and definition 3. Measurement”

From page 4: …”we recommended that the Ministry use existing policy – in particular the Creating Pathways to Success policy, portfolios, and professional development – as a key anchor for the upcoming Well-Being Strategy. We also recommend that the Ministry develop consistent language and goals throughout its policies so that the links and interconnections are clear. For example, one consistent strategy could link the portfolios in Creating Pathways with the WellBeing Strategy and the Learning Skills and Work Habits on Ontario report cards.”

Check it out! Rowan

March 27, 2017 at 12:00 pm Leave a comment

March 19 deadline for feedback to Ministry well-being education strategy

Reminding everyone that March 19, 2017 is the final date to submit feedback on the Ministry’s well-being strategy for education. Check out the Ministry’s page at http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/about/wellbeing2.html for various print and vidoes resources and the link to the engagement portal where you can submit feedback.

From the site:  “The Ministry of Education is looking to develop a shared vision of how we can best support the well-being of all students, in collaboration with parents, students, educators and administrators, counsellors, social workers, and community partners across the province.

Work is happening every day in local school communities to promote and support the well-being of students. At the same time, we also know that there are significant challenges and more work is necessary to support the well-being of all Ontario learners. The Ministry of Education wants to learn from, and build on the successful work underway, as we collectively move forward on our shared goal of promoting student well-being.

By drawing on the knowledge of those who have done important work over many years to foster well-being among our students, we will strive to establish a common understanding of what promoting well-being means in schools, identify challenges and opportunities for improving supports for well-being and consider how we will know our impact on well-being to best guide our future efforts.

With your feedback and with contributions from partner ministries, we will develop a provincial student well-being framework for K-12, that will reflect our shared commitments and the positive outcomes we want for all our students.”

Check it out! Rowan

March 1, 2017 at 8:00 am Leave a comment

New UNESCO document on school violence & bullying

UNESCO has released an 2017 document titled School Violence and Bullying: A Global Perspective. Pages 8-11 provide a summary of the content and include sections titled:

  • The scope of school violence and bullying
  • The prevalence of school violence and bullying
  • The impact of school violence and bullying
  • The response to school violence and bullying
  • Key challenges
  • Priorities for action

Why is it important? See the impact it has on student success(from page 27):

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Check it out! Rowan

 

January 25, 2017 at 1:00 pm Leave a comment

Bell Let’s Talk Day; CAMH video on mental health

January 25, 2017 is Bell Let’s Talk Day. TDSB will be joining the conversation on Twitter about mental health with the goal of raising awareness about programs, services and supports in the TDSB and helping to dispel the stigma of mental health. Join and follow the conversation with us @TDSB and @TDSB_MHWB.

CAMH has developed a short video that explains the separate but interconnected concepts of mental health and mental illness, as well as what it means to promote mental health in ourselves and in our school communities.

 

Check out the TDSB mental health & well-being services:  http://www.tdsb.on.ca/ElementarySchool/SupportingYou/MentalHealthWellbeing.aspx

 

January 24, 2017 at 1:00 pm Leave a comment

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